Saturday, August 27, 2016

ESTROGEN AND MEMORY

A study conducted at the University of Southern California demonstrated that estrogen promotes the growth of those essential neurons in the brain's hippocampus that are critical to memory function. Scientists there created a hippocampal campus in a petri dish, inducing these cells from the memory center to set up housekeeping in the USC lab. They then squirted conjugated equine estrogens (CEEs or Premarin) on the nerve cell colonies and watched the results under a videomicroscope.

The cells literally bristled with excitement. The addition of estrogen juice significantly increased the number of dendrites or outgrowths of the cell membranes which are known to be cellular markers of memory formation. Dendrites hook-up with other neurons to form new connections, a process that promotes brain 'plasticity' or the ability to learn new material and make new associations. In other words, the same cellular events that occur in the hippocampus of the brain during memory formation happened in these brain cell cultures when estrogen was added.

When I see patients going through the menopausal transition, I not only inquire about hot flashes, night sweats, and the quality of their sleep, I also ask "How's your mood?" and "How's your memory?". The lack of estrogen affects women differently, some struggling far more than others in a brain function sense. I think the problems with verbal memory and executive functioning (starting a multi-step task and completing it successfully) along with the increase in anxiety and depression that can accompany falling estrogen levels are too often not addressed in women of age.

schedule an appt at my office 630-220-4122 or EMAIL ME jones@crtconnect.com.

hormone replacement therapy, hormone imbalance, women to women, bodylogicmd, hormone replacement after hysterectomy, bioidentical hormones, HRT, women's health, men's health, TS Wiley, The Wiley Protocol

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

WYETH WILLING TO PAY MILLIONS TO INFLUENCE DOCTORS TO PRESCRIBE PREMPRO

PREMPRO is a combination of Premarin, an estrogen drug derived from the urine of pregnant mares and first approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1942, with an additional hormone, progestin. Part of the Premarin saga shows how a drug maker successfully and cannily expanded a franchise whose central ingredient is horse estrogens into a billion-dollar panacea for aging women. Yet several hundred pages of court documents also raise questions about another aspect of Premarin’s trajectory: how Wyeth worked over decades to maintain the image and credibility of its hormone drugs even as the products were repeatedly under siege.
BY the mid-1990s, after a few studies had reported a protective effect of hormone drugs on the heart, Wyeth had begun to reposition menopausal hormone therapy as a preventive health choice that could help inhibit heart disease and other maladies, according to court documents.
That marketing strategy coincided with the introduction of Wyeth’s new combination hormone drug Prempro, which included a progestin hormone to keep estrogen from causing excessive cell growth in the uterine lining.
In one commercial from a Wyeth research institute, the model Lauren Hutton runs down a beach and warns of the health risks of estrogen loss.
“My doctor said if you don’t replace estrogen that you lose at menopause, your risk for certain age-related diseases could increase,” Ms. Hutton said in the commercial. In a voice-over, a narrator told viewers about studies looking into the connections between menopause and heart disease, memory loss and sight loss. This is all true if you replace hormones with actual hormones, not synthetically and chemically changed hormones.
“Believe me,” Ms. Hutton said, “the time to protect your future is now.”
Sally Beatty, a spokeswoman for Pfizer, said this was a “help seeking” ad, of the type encouraged by the F.D.A. She added that the promotion did not mention any specific drugs, not did it suggest that drugs could cure the ailments described.
The labels for Premarin and Prempro at the time said the drugs were approved to treat moderate to severe symptoms of menopause like hot flashes, night sweats and vaginal dryness and to prevent osteoporosis.
But Wyeth also positioned its menopausal hormone drugs as having larger protective benefits, court documents show.
Wyeth used proxies to promote a wide range of health benefits from hormone therapy, paying millions of dollars to influential doctors and medical groups and helping them develop abstracts for medical conferences and articles for medical journals, according to court documents.
The company also paid $12 million to sponsor continuing medical education programs from 2002 through 2006 at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The programs, including an assertion that the Women’s Health Initiative and another heart-risk study “miss the mark on quality of life,” reached thousands of doctors.
Doctors were aware in the 1990s that hormone therapy could increase a woman’s risk of breast cancer, says Dr. Carol Bates, the director of the primary care program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.
But based on the results of observational studies that had been published, many physicians, herself included, believed that the drugs’ ostensible ability to reduce heart attacks and perhaps Alzheimer’s would outweigh a breast cancer risk, she says.
“In the 1990s, there was actually tremendous pressure to put women on hormone therapy, and it came from a good place,” Dr. Bates says. “But it was taken a bit to the extreme.”
HORMONE therapy — aimed at the symptoms it effectively treats and with full disclosure about its possible risks — has many advocates. Dr. Lynne T. Shuster, the director of the women’s health clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., says such regimens can be very worthwhile for treating hot flashes, night sweats and vaginal dryness associated with menopause.
And some users agree.
Irene Fisher, a kitchen and bath designer in Baldwin, N.Y., says she has been taking Prempro for 16 years to control hot flashes and night sweats.
“I always feel good when I take it,” she says. The benefits are worth a small risk, Ms. Fisher says, adding that she has an annual mammogram to check for breast cancer and that “I think you have to know your own body.”
But many women were not so fully informed in the 1990s.
In 1996, for example, a federal study reported that breast cancer risk may have been “substantially underestimated.” Wyeth reacted with plans to dismiss it as “just one more paper,” and try to “overshadow” it by directing journalists to other studies, according to documents cited in the court of appeals decision in Missouri.
In 1996, for example, a federal study reported that breast cancer risk may have been “substantially underestimated.” Wyeth reacted with plans to dismiss it as “just one more paper,” and try to “overshadow” it by directing journalists to other studies, according to documents cited in the court of appeals decision in Missouri.
In 1997, Wyeth began working with DesignWrite, a company in Princeton, N.J., that is paid by drug makers to develop manuscripts for publication in medical journals. The specific objective of a publication plan for Premarin was to “increase physician awareness on the multitude of benefits that hormone replacement therapy provides” and “diminish the negative perceptions associated with estrogens and cancer,” according to a 1997 DesignWrite proposal prepared for Wyeth.
Over the next decade, Wyeth paid DesignWrite to prepare at least 60 articles for publication in medical journals on the potential benefits of hormone therapy for cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, colon cancer, vision loss and other health problems, the court documents show.
In response to an e-mail query, Michael Platt, president of DesignWrite, wrote that the articles were all medically and scientifically accurate and valid and peer reviewed. But Wyeth’s and DesignWrite’s effort hit an obstacle in 2002 when researchers reported the results of the Women’s Health Initiative.
In 2002, researchers halted the largest clinical trial ever conducted of women’s health because participants who took certain combined hormones had an increased risk of breast cancer — as well as a higher risk of heart attack, stroke and blood clots in the lungs — compared with those taking a placebo. Other parts of the same federal study, called the Women’s Health Initiative, later found that hormone drugs increased the risk of dementia in a subset of participants, those age 65 and older. Sales of Wyeth’s hormone drugs peaked at about $2 billion in 2001, but after results of the 2002 study came out sales plummeted. Because these drugs were not bioidentical hormones and do not behave the same when taken orally and are chemical mistakes of the actual hormone.
The National Institutes of Health ultimately decided to start using the term “menopausal hormone therapy” instead of “hormone replacement therapy,” says Marcia L. Stefanick, a professor of medicine at the Stanford University medical school who was principal investigator on the Women’s Health Initiative study at her institution.
While the drugs are effective at treating symptoms like hot flashes, she says, the word “replacement” implies that women are getting hormones "replaced" which is not the case with drugs like Premarin or Prempro.
In 2003 Wyeth added a “black box” warning to the label saying Prempro should not be prescribed to prevent cardiovascular disease. The same year, the F.D.A. approved a lower dose version of Prempro so women would have more options.
Dr. Adriane Fugh-Berman, an associate professor at the medical school of Georgetown University, considers both Premarin and Prempro examples of drugs that gained widespread popularity before science had established the full extent of their risks.
“Where there has always been a push is where there isn’t data,” says Dr. Fugh-Berman, who has been a paid expert witness for plaintiffs in the hormone litigation.

Sunday, August 21, 2016

MENOPAUSE AND SLEEP

Symptoms you may have that are related to menopause include hot flashes and sweats, Anxiety, Depression, Lowered sex drive (libido), Dry skin, Dryness in the vagina, Bone thinning (osteoporosis) over some years, trouble sleeping, trouble concentrating, constipation, joint pain, thinning hair, loss of energy, just to name a few.

Replacing your hormones with plant based transdermal hormones is the way I recommend to completely get rid of menopausal symptoms. The alternative recommended by standard of care and mainstream medicine is to cut out coffee, tea and nicotine, keep your room cool – use a fan if necessary, spray your face with a cool water atomiser, wear several layers of light clothing that you can easily take off or put back on, wear natural fibres such as silk or cotton instead of man made fabrics, cut down on alcohol, sip cold or iced non alcoholic drinks, have a lukewarm shower or bath instead of a hot one, if you sweat a lot at night, put a towel on your bed so you can easily change if it gets we, if you are taking tamoxifen, you could try taking half the dose in the morning and half in the evening, or acupuncture. Personally speaking, these are ridiculous options and bandaids to a very serious issue of NOT HAVING HORMONES. While some may joke about a woman’s sudden feeling of warmth, hot flashes are no laughing matter. They can cause insomnia, distract you from work, and cause excessive sweating that makes getting through the day without a change of clothes impossible. Not to mention all the other symptoms listed above are not "in our head"!

Experts are still not completely in agreement about the cause of hot flashes during menopause. Most attribute it to the decrease in the production of estrogen, which occurs as women progress toward the menopause stage. As the Mayo Clinic points out, however, low estrogen alone does not cause hot flashes as patients of all ages with low estrogen don’t always have hot flashes. Somehow, it is the decrease in estrogen that accompanies menopause that is believed to be the cause.

For most women, this decrease is gradual, but many experts believe when estrogen falls, the hypothalamus is adversely affected. As the hypothalamus regulates your body temperature, the decrease in estrogen causes the brain to detect too much body heat. As a natural reaction to this, some theorize the brain releases hormones to help lower body heat, causing a patient’s heart rate to rise and blood vessels to dilate in order to allow more blood to flow through and dissipate the heat. The increased blood flow causes the body to produce its natural cooling method- sweat.

However, if you are replacing your hormones correctly and still find that you are not sleeping well or feeling anxious and tense, maybe you need Magnesium!

Magnesium is a mineral that is responsible for the correct metabolic function of over 350 enzymes in the body. Magnesium is found in leafy green vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes and even dark chocolate. Spinach, pumpkin seeds and black beans are especially high in magnesium. However, many of us are deficient in magnesium … which might explain your chocolate cravings!

Just why do we call it a miracle mineral?


• Magnesium can help you sleep. Dr. Lipman recommends taking 1000mg before bed to help you fall and stay asleep through the night.

• Magnesium helps to balance the nervous system. Magnesium has a calming effect, which can help you relax and unwind.

• Magnesium helps to relax aching, tense muscles. Muscle soreness is a fairly common detox response when people are going through the first few days of the Cleanse program. We always recommend to drink lots of water, do gentle stretching and try taking some magnesium to help with the muscle aches, soreness or spasms.

• Magnesium can help with constipation. If you’re experiencing constipation, take 1000 mg of magnesium citrate at night, and that should get things moving by morning.

A mineral that helps you to calm down, sleep better and relieves constipation? Sounds like a miracle to me!

Another way to enjoy the benefits of magnesium is by treating yourself to an epsom salt bath. The magnesium in the salt and the hot, soothing water will help you relax and release tension. Better yet, take an epsom salt bath while nibbling some dark chocolate!

Saturday, March 19, 2016

MENOPAUSE; WHO MERITS TREATMENT?

Technically, menopause is twelve months after the last menstrual flow of a woman's life, and the climacteric is the period of time preceding and following this event, or peri and post menopause. For most women the symptoms occur between the ages of 30 and 55 years of age.

The menstrual cycle usually goes through many changes, some slow and some sudden, before stopping altogether. A woman's periods may become erratic, closer together or farther apart. She may skip a period or two or have spotting at other times in her cycle or bleed heavier and longer. All of these events can be considered dysrhythmic at any age.

A common experience is loss of large amounts of blood with a period and passage of large clots. When a woman nears the cessation of her periods, she may not ovulate for one cycle or several cycles. In either case, the endometrium doesn't receive enough estrogen message to stop thickening. It grows until its heavy bulk causes a heavy flow. This is a symptom of low chronic estrogen levels.

Signals of fluctuating estrogen receptor activity include hot flashes or flushes, changes in sleep patterns, headaches or migraines, high energy, high creativity and or mood changes. As with PMS, some of these are symptoms of inadequate progesterone or progesterone receptors.










Email me at jones@crtconnect.com or schedule an appt at my office 847-325-5110 or to get my cell phone EMAIL ME FIRST. hormone replacement therapy, hormone imbalance, women to women, bodylogicmd, hormone replacement after hysterectomy, bioidentical hormones, HRT, women's health, men's health, TS Wiley, The Wiley Protocol

Saturday, March 5, 2016

Are High Levels of Estrogen Dangerous?

It is interesting that high dose estrogen was the first effective treatment of choice for metastatic breast cancer through the mid to late 1970's. That is until Tamoxifen was introduced and replaced estrogen therapy due to its superior toxicity profile. Tamoxifen and raloxifene belong to a class of anti-estrogen drugs called SERMs. According to James Ingle, Professor of Oncology and Foust Professor in Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, there are genetic markers that appear to be associated with response to SERM treatment. The same genes are involved in regulation of the BRCA genes, and so may also be important in selecting patients for PARP inhibitor therapy, a therapy that is currently in clinical trials for BRCA-related and triple negative breast cancer.

The story of estrogen's role in breast cancer is starting to look like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. A spate of recent studies demonstrates that the hormone—long known to fuel growth of most breast tumors—may actually be effective in treating breast cancer, or even preventing it.

Using estrogen to treat breast cancer is not new—high dose synthetic estrogen DES (diethylstilbestrol) was a mainstay in treatment of metastatic breast cancer in the 1960s and 1970s. But new research has shown that even lower doses of human estrogen (estradiol) has a therapeutic benefit. Furthermore, in the laboratory, scientists are now demonstrating that estrogen can kill breast cancer cells, causing apoptotic death.

Len Lichtenfeld, M.D., deputy chief medical office at the national office of the American Cancer Society in Washington D.C., is familiar with estrogen's dual nature in treating breast cancer. “In the 1970s, I got responses by putting advanced breast cancer patients on high-dose estrogen, and sometimes, by taking them off of it,” he said. “We now think that worked by changing the hormonal environment, and there is not anything wrong with looking at use of estrogen again.”

Two years ago, Matthew Ellis, M.D., Ph.D., director of the breast cancer program at Washington University in St. Louis, published a key study in JAMA on the treatment of breast cancer using oral estradiol, identical to the principal active form of estrogen in a women's body. Ellis found that low-dosage estradiol (6 milligrams), a level similar to that found in premenopausal women, was as effective as 30-milligram dosages, the amount found in pregnant women. Tumors shrank or stopped growing in about 30% of women in both investigational groups, but toxicity was reduced in the low-dose group.

Some of the cancers recurred, but about a third of those women then responded again to the anti-estrogenic aromatase inhibitors. That meant that patients who had previously taken aromatase inhibitors but had become resistant to them experienced tumor shrinkage using estradiol—a treatment that costs $1 a day. Later, after they became resistant to estrogen, they responded to anti-estrogens again, said Ellis. These treatments were much better tolerated than chemotherapy would have been, Ellis said, adding, “This strategy is very effective in a select group of patients.”

Jordan has focused his Georgetown lab on understanding how estrogen kills breast cancer cells that have become resistant to the anti-estrogenic effects of tamoxifen, raloxifene, and aromatase inhibitors.

“After five years of anti-estrogen therapy, a switch takes place inside breast cancer cells and resistance to these agents develops,” he said. “Now when you use estrogen, it triggers [cancer cell] death and not growth.” Jordan adds that if researchers can find the mechanism that pulls this trigger, it may be possible to come up with a new, targeted therapy that mimics estrogen in its Dr. Jekyll guise.
JNCI J Natl Cancer Inst (2011) 103 (12): 920-921.
doi: 10.1093/jnci/djr233





Email me at jones@crtconnect.com or schedule an appt at my office 847-325-5110 or to get my cell phone EMAIL ME FIRST.

hormone replacement therapy, hormone imbalance, women to women, bodylogicmd, hormone replacement after hysterectomy, bioidentical hormones, HRT, women's health, men's health, TS Wiley, The Wiley Protocol

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Discontinuing Hormone Therapy May Increase Risk of Depression in Some Women: Psychiatric News: Vol 50, No 15

Discontinuing Hormone Therapy May Increase Risk of Depression in Some Women: Psychiatric News: Vol 50, No 15 Email me at jones@crtconnect.com or schedule an appt at my office 847-325-5110 or to get my cell phone EMAIL ME FIRST.hormone replacement therapy, hormone imbalance, women to women, bodylogicmd, hormone replacement after hysterectomy, bioidentical hormones, HRT, women's health, men's health, TS Wiley, The Wiley Protocol

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

A Patient Testimonial


Wiley Protocol Hormone therapy has positively changed my life in so many
ways. I’ve been on the protocol for almost a year now and cannot say enough good
things about it. I had been diagnosed with early ovarian failure at the age of twenty-
seven. Needless to say, there were many ways that my body was rebelling against the
hormonal imbalance. For the better part of ten years, I struggled to find the right
hormone replacement. All of the options that had been given to me only consisted of
various types of birth control pills. I switched pills multiple times, trying to find the pill
that made me feel like the ‘real’ me. Little did I know at the time, the reduction in
estrogen and progesterone affected me more than I realized. Slowly but surely, after
taking pill after pill, I just started to fall apart – physically, mentally, and emotionally.

I learned about The WP when I went to a new doctor for joint pain. Her advice
was that I needed a better hormone replacement. It was hard for me to believe that a
hormonal imbalance could be the cause of my discomfort but she assured me that this
was the case. Initially, I felt a bit overwhelmed to learn about how the program worked;
using the different creams in different amounts, on different days, and in cycles. It then
donned on me that the easy, daily pill-popping was not working and hadn’t been for a
long time. What did I have to lose? So, I then began The Wiley Protocol. With in a few
weeks many things started to change for the better. While using WP hormones, I began
to have improvements in symptoms that I didn’t realize were related to hormonal
imbalance.

Along with the diminishment of joint pain, I also noticed; I have an increased sex
drive, blood pressure readings that are similar to pre-pregnancy rates, less frequent bouts
with anxiety, improved critical thinking, and noticed that I feel more emotionally level-
headed. Not to mention, I not longer have ANY hot flashes! Not only have I realized
these improvements but so have many of my friends/family as well. They say I seem
much more relaxed and calm. I’ve even been informed by my husband that under no
circumstance is it acceptable to discontinue using these hormones. I am so grateful to
have found Wiley Protocol Bio-identical Hormones. They are just what I was looking for
– they’ve helped me find the ‘real’ me again.





Email me at jones@crtconnect.com or schedule an appt at my office 847-325-5110 or to get my cell phone EMAIL ME FIRST. hormone replacement therapy, hormone imbalance, women to women, bodylogicmd, hormone replacement after hysterectomy, bioidentical hormones, HRT, women's health, men's health, TS Wiley, The Wiley Protocol

Monday, February 8, 2016

Common Questions Asked When Starting Transdermal Hormones


Many of us need even more hormones than the basic Wiley Protocol provides. It is the starting Protocol to achieve the blood levels that have shown success during the early studies.The Wiley Protocol | Biomimetic Hormone Restoration Therapy Natural Estradiol and Progesterone CreamThe Wiley Protocol® is a trademarked, patent pending hormone replacement therapy (HRT) delivery system. It consists of biomimetic estradiol and progesterone in a topical cream preparation -- dosed to mimic the natural hormones produced by your body when you were 20 years-old.
The creams and their amounts are designed to vary throughout the 28 day cycle because your youthful hormone levels naturally fluctuate. The Wiley Protocol targets age 20 as a baseline because heart disease and stroke, Type II diabetes, cancer and Alzheimer’s disease are not usual concerns for a healthy young individual. Approximately 80% of women with a uterus who have used the WP have had perfectly normal regular menstrual periods every 28 days. It is recommended that women without a uterus use the Wiley Protocol Lunar Calendar™* Day 11 or 12. Day 12 is better to see the estrogen peak. Check both estradiol and progesterone on both days. Day 21 is the progesterone peak but check both progesterone and estradiol. Try to do this about three or four hours after applying your cream. Don't put cream on the area where the needle will enter. Why does the Wiley Protocol advocate high doses of hormones?Because WP is biomimetic, it has been designed to mimic the hormone blood levels of a healthy young woman.
What are the optimum blood ranges for the Protocol?*Optimum ranges include:Day 12 estradiol - 350 to 550 pg/dlDay 12 progesterone should be 1-2Day 21 progesterone 10 -22 ng/dl. Day 21 estrogen should be 150-250.Note: These ranges are for a healthy, young 20-25 year old. It is best to use the same lab so you are measuring with the same measurement. Do I have to test blood every month?No, it takes a few months for the receptors to come on board so you may wait until the third month to test and then examine the results with your doctor who may change your Protocol.It is important to look at symptoms too. If you don't feel well and are showing symptoms of being low on a hormone check with your doctor. Thereafter many women only test periodically. It's good to test when you feel good to know what that looks like and also when you feel bad. Stress can bring the levels down very fast. The important thing is you don’t want to be hovering in the area below the blood ranges if you have symptoms.







Why do we need to get blood levels on days 12 and 21?By testing on days 12 and 21 we can assure ourselves that we are reproducing a normal cycle of a younger woman. Since the Basic Wiley Protocol rarely gets blood levels of more than 300 on Day 12, the blood work is a way of justifying to your doctor that you might need more to meet the upper levels to normal. Day 11 or 12. Day 12 is better to see the estrogen peak. Check both estradiol and progesterone on both days. Day 21 is the progesterone peak but check both progesterone and estradiol. Try to do this about three or four hours after applying your cream. Don't put cream on the area where the needle will enter. Checking on both days 12 and 21 will show an inverse relationship between the hormones. Why do we need to get blood tests?Blood tests are done to get a baseline so your doctor can adjust for accuracy. You will also make sure that you are getting into the ranges of healthy young women of 50 years ago who had low levels of diseases of aging. It can be very hard to learn about your symptoms without the help of blood testing.



Why the Wiley Protocol®?The Wiley Protocol is the only HRT that has been developed under the scrutiny of a practicing Oncologist. Over the last five years anecdotal statistics have been gathered from thousands of women ages 19 - 90, at meetings, who are on the Protocol, suggesting a profile of safety and efficacy. Choosing the Wiley Protocol is not only a vote for nature, it is also a vote for science.








Email me at jones@crtconnect.com or schedule an appt at my office 847-325-5110 or to get my cell phone EMAIL ME FIRST. hormone replacement therapy, hormone imbalance, women to women, bodylogicmd, hormone replacement after hysterectomy, bioidentical hormones, HRT, women's health, men's health, TS Wiley, The Wiley Protocol

Sunday, January 31, 2016






Email me at jones@crtconnect.com or schedule an appt at my office 847-325-5110 or to get my cell phone EMAIL ME FIRST. hormone replacement therapy, hormone imbalance, women to women, bodylogicmd, hormone replacement after hysterectomy, bioidentical hormones, HRT, women's health, men's health, TS Wiley, The Wiley Protocol

Saturday, January 30, 2016

Let Me Show You How to Replace Your Hormones

Let me show you how to replace your hormones and I will tell you why. Here is an analogy to help you understand the difference it will be to you if you are shown correctly how to use hormones. When I was growing up my dad would make these amazing awesome paper airplanes for me. I would throw them and they would fly swiftly through the air until they hit the wall or the couch or whatever. He could make them fly and twirl by changing how he folded the paper. I wanted to make my paper airplanes fly just like his so I would try to copy how he made the airplanes but of course until he showed me how to fold the paper precisely my airplane was never as good as his at flying and barely traveled at all before it just fell to the ground.

Hormone replacement is similar to the paper airplane story. There is a method and a way of applying the dosage to mimic physiological levels normal to cycling females. This is important because it determines the effectiveness and response your body and mind will obtain. Until you are shown the way, you might as well be crumpling up a piece of paper and throwing it to see if it flies, over and over again, but wondering why you don't feel better and aren't getting improvement in your sleep, energy, brain fog, libido, vaginal dryness, dry skin, hair growth, weight gain around the mid section despite every known diet under the sun!

Email me and let me know what struggles and challenges you have had with replacing your hormones! My email is jones@crtconnect.com. I will answer your questions and guide you! Free, no charge to you. Now take action and let's change how women age!

EMAIL ME TODAY AT JONES@CRTCONNECT.COM




hormone replacement therapy, hormone imbalance, women to women, bodylogicmd, hormone replacement after hysterectomy, bioidentical hormones, HRT, women's health, men's health, TS Wiley, The Wiley Protocol

Tuesday, January 12, 2016

RECOMMENDED TESTS FOR ALL WOMEN AGE 50

Doctors recommend that all women age 50:

Get Tested for Hepatitis C

Everyone born between 1945 and 1965 needs to be screened for the hepatitis C virus. (USPSTF)

Get Shots to Protect Your Health

Get important adult shots (vaccinations). (ACIP)

Get Tested for Breast Cancer

Get a mammogram every 2 years. (USPSTF)

Get Tested for Cervical Cancer

Get a Pap test every 3 years. If you get a Pap test and an HPV test, you can get screened every 5 years instead. (USPSTF)

Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

Get tested regularly for colorectal cancer, starting at age 50. (USPSTF)

Get Your Blood Pressure Checked

Get your blood pressure checked at least once every 2 years. (USPSTF)

Get Your Well-Woman Visit Every Year

See a doctor or nurse for a checkup once a year. (IOM)

Get the Seasonal Flu Vaccine

Get the flu vaccine every year to help prevent the flu. (ACIP)

Get Tested for HIV

Get tested for HIV at least once. You may need to get tested more often depending on your risk. (USPSTF)

Based on family history and other risk factors, doctors recommend that some women age 50:

Talk with a Doctor about Your Alcohol Use

If you are concerned about your drinking, ask your doctor about screening and counseling. (USPSTF)

Get Help with Healthy Eating

If your doctor has told you that you are at risk for heart disease or diabetes, ask about dietary counseling. (USPSTF)

Get a Bone Density Test

Talk with your doctor to find out if you need a bone density test. (USPSTF)

Get Your Cholesterol Checked

If you or someone in your family ever had heart disease, or if you have other risk factors for heart disease (like smoking, diabetes, high blood pressure, or obesity), get your cholesterol checked once every 5 years. (USPSTF)

Get Tested for Hepatitis B

If you have risk factors for hepatitis B (like any injection drug use or if you were born in a country where hepatitis B is common), talk to your doctor about getting tested. (USPSTF)

Get Help to Quit Smoking

If you smoke, ask your doctor about services to help you quit. (USPSTF)

Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

If you are overweight or have other risk factors for type 2 diabetes (like a family history of diabetes), ask your doctor to test you for diabetes. (USPSTF)

Take Steps to Protect Yourself from Relationship Violence

If you think your partner might be abusive, talk with your doctor about getting help. (USPSTF)

Talk with Your Doctor about Depression

Talk with your doctor about how you are feeling if you have been sad, down, or hopeless. (USPSTF)

Watch Your Weight

If you are overweight, ask your doctor about screening and counseling for obesity. (USPSTF)

Get Tested for Syphilis

If you have risk factors for syphilis (like having sex for drugs or money), ask your doctor about testing and prevention counseling. (USPSTF)

Get Tested for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea

If you have more than one sex partner or a new sex partner, get tested for chlamydia and gonorrhea. Ask your doctor about prevention counseling. (USPSTF)

Talk with a Doctor If Breast or Ovarian Cancer Runs in Your Family

Talk with your doctor if you have a family history of breast or ovarian cancer. (USPSTF)

FOR MORE INFO EMAIL ME AT LOVEMYHORMONES1111@GMAIL.COM

hormone replacement therapy, hormone imbalance, women to women, bodylogicmd, hormone replacement after hysterectomy, bioidentical hormones, HRT, women's health, men's health, TS Wiley, The Wiley Protocol

Sunday, January 3, 2016

Gretchen Jones "Love My Hormones": HORMONE REPLACEMENT STILL CONTROVERSIAL

Gretchen Jones "Love My Hormones": HORMONE REPLACEMENT STILL CONTROVERSIAL

hormone replacement therapy, hormone imbalance, women to women, bodylogicmd, hormone replacement after hysterectomy, bioidentical hormones, HRT, women's health, men's health, TS Wiley, The Wiley Protocol

BREAST CANCER AND HORMONES; IS IT SAFE

In my experience, women associate breast cancer and hormones together. I understand one of the greatest concerns some women have is developing breast cancer during their life time. Breast cancer mortality is on the decline according to some studies and breast cancer awareness is everywhere with increasing utilization of mammograms and "the pink ribbon" with its own breast cancer awareness week every October.

The risk factors implicated in the development of breast cancer include:

Age

Family History, affected mother or sister 2 to 3 relative risk, aunt or grandmother 1.5 relative risk, and affected mother AND sister 14.0 relative risk

Excessive alcohol intake - women who drink two to five drinks a day run a 41% greater risk of developing breast cancer than non drinkers

Obesity - post menopausal women who gain 11 to 22 pounds have an 18% higher risk of breast cancer than women who gain 4-5 lbs and in those who gain 44 to 55 pounds the risk jumps to 40%.

The breast cancer controversy began after the report of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH) raised concerns regarding the roles of hormones and breast cancer. This caused widespread discontinuation of the hormones and deprived women of the benefit of hormones. The study was discontinued in 1992, 3 years prematurely. Was planned for 8.5 years, still too short of an interval as it takes more than 8 years for the discovery of breast cancer from a single cell based on doubling times. Based on this, all of the 290 cases of breast cancer had malignant cells at the onset of the study (there were a total of 161,208 participants).

The trial of the estrogen/progestin was stopped due to minimal increase of hazard ratio of 1.26, which was only of borderline significance. The study of estrogen alone has not shown an increase in the risk of breast cancer at 7 years. There is confirming evidence from more than seventy studies that exogenous therapy, and even unopposed estrogens, do not increase the risk for breast cancer. There have been eleven studies, with none to the contrary, that have examined survival from breast cancer developing in estrogen users and have observed lower mortality. Long term progesterone deficiency has been shown to increase the risk of breast cancer. In one study in patients with stage IV metastatic breast cancer, estrogen with high dose progesterone was shown to be very effective. After giving the estrogen for seven days to enhance the progesterone receptors in metastatic cancer cells high dose medroxyprogesterone acetate (not my first choice) was given and the remission rate was 56% for up to six years.

The most consistently decreased risk of breast cancer in estrogen users has been those who also received progestogens (and it would be nice to see some studies using natural progesterone vs synthetic progestogens).

Breast cancer is being diagnosed in early stages, and the survival rates have increased due to early diagnosis and treatment. Women lead normal lives for many years. We need to be given the opportunity to benefit from all available treatment. Estrogen replacement can be used for severe symptoms in breast cancer survivors after thorough explanation, and understanding, of benefits and risks.

hormone replacement therapy, hormone imbalance, women to women, bodylogicmd, hormone replacement after hysterectomy, bioidentical hormones, HRT, women's health, men's health, TS Wiley, The Wiley Protocol

HORMONE REPLACEMENT STILL CONTROVERSIAL

Hormone replacement is still controversial. In the 1960's women were ecstatic to finally have a remedy to the hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, mood swings, low libido issues and doctors were more than willing and able to write the prescription to alleviate their symptoms. However, after the publications of the Heart and Estrogen/Progestin Replacement Study (HERS) and the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) studies, doubts were raised about the increased risk of hormone therapy. Physicians became reluctant to prescribe hormone replacement because of the widely publicized reports that estrogens cause endometrial cancer, that combination therapy (via Prempro) increased breast cancer and stroke risks. Even so, estrogen therapy continues to be popular among many patients.

First, we now know that oral metabolism of estradiol is DIFFERENT from transdermal estradiol. We also now know that there IS a difference between PROGESTINS and NATURAL PROGESTERONE.

Second, we also know that long term estrogen deficiency can and often does lead to osteoporosis and related fracture complications, atherosclerotic heart disease, psychogenic manifestations (depression, anxiety, insomnia, irritability), alzheimer's disease, increase risk for colon cancer and who knows we may discover even more disease and health related disorders associated with hormone deficiency over the next 100 years.

Third, we now know that the belief that estrogen treatment causes endometrial cancer is no longer valid and that the incidence of cancer (of the endometrium, or of the breast) need not increase as a result of long term estrogen therapy if cyclic progesterone in adequate dosages are added to the estrogen replacement therapy.

Email lovemyhormones1111@gmail.com for more information and to contact me directly hormone replacement therapy, hormone imbalance, women to women, bodylogicmd, hormone replacement after hysterectomy, bioidentical hormones, HRT, women's health, men's health, TS Wiley, The Wiley Protocol

Wednesday, September 2, 2015

Want to Feel Better? Younger.? Look Better?

Contact me and let me help you understand Hormones and why they are necessary for women. Men need them too. However, women abruptly lose all production of their estradiol when their ovaries no longer have eggs! And that is occurring earlier and earlier due to our environment and the changes from our earlier ancestors who didn't use all the chemicals and hormone additives in their home farmed food. I am treating many elderly patients and underprivileged patients who do not have access to this information or do not understand the results of hormone loss and its permanent effect to their lives.

You can reach me at lovemyhormones1111@gmail.com.

hormone replacement therapy, hormone imbalance, women to women, bodylogic md, hormone replacement after hysterectomy, bioidentical hormones, HRT, women's health, men's health, TS Wiley, The Wiley Protocol gretchen jones hormones, lovemyhormones, estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, BHRT, hot flashes, night sweats, fatigue, low libido, hair loss, thinning hair, irritability, fatigue